Esquire Theme by Matthew Buchanan
Social icons by Tim van Damme

31

Dec

speakingseagull:

Physeter macrocephalus! Physeter catadon is extinct.

speakingseagull:

Physeter macrocephalus! Physeter catadon is extinct.

29

Dec

fullbloom:

d.Sharp Journal: Astonishing

26

Dec

Watch this.. The mimic octopus.. :)

(Source: youtube.com)

20

Dec

Humpback whales form friendships that last years

Searching for a friendly female perhaps?

Humpback whales form lasting bonds, the first baleen whales known to do so.
Individual female humpbacks reunite each summer to feed and swim alongside one another in the Gulf of St Lawrence, off Canada, scientists have found.

Toothed whales, such as sperm whales, associate with one another, but larger baleen whales, which filter their food, have been thought less social.

The finding raises the possibility that commercial whaling may have broken apart social groups of whales.

Friends reunited
Details of the discovery are published in the journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

Dr Christian Ramp and colleagues of the Mingan Island Cetacean Study group based in St Lambert, Canada have been studying whales in the Gulf of St Lawrence since 1997.

Together with researchers from Germany and Sweden, the scientists are recording the movements of baleen whales including blue, fin, minke and humpback whales, adding to a set of data that stretches back 30 years.

Read More

08

Jul

The Downside To The Recovery Of The Ozone Hole

While the hole in the Earth’s protective ozone layer is slowly healing, its recovery might have a downside, scientists say: Climate change could change wind patterns and send ozone from high in the atmosphere down to the surface, where it is a major component of smog.

The discovery of a hole in the ozone layer above Antarctica was announced by a team of British scientists in 1985. The cause of the hole was attributed to ozone-depleting chemicals like chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which were primarily used in cooling units and propellants. When CFCs reach the ozone layer, they release chlorine atoms that rip ozone apart and peel away layers of Earth’s natural sunscreen.

Simulations of life without the ozone layer, which is located in the Earth’s stratosphere, are not pretty. The stratosphere (the second layer of the Earth’s atmosphere, just above the one in which we dwell, the troposphere) contains 90 percent of the Earth’s ozone at altitudes between 6 and 31 miles (9.6 and 50 kilometers) above us, where it traps most of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays before they can reach the Earth’s surface.

Read More